Grey Wolf: Trust of Self

romulus1

Wolves have an intertwined relationship with Romans. Faunus is shown wearing a wolf skin. The She-Wolf nursed the Twins, Romulus and Remus.

Here is one of my nature writings about wolves in general.

The largest of Canis Family is Grey Wolf, the quintessential wild Animal. Loved by those who regard Her brave and loyal. Hated by those who fear and misunderstand Her. For example although the Norse admired Grey Wolf for her courage, they were afraid of her fierceness.

As an Individual, She is not formidable, but in her complex social relationships, Grey Wolf makes up for this. She travels, hunts, and dens together with her Fellow Grey Wolves. Her Pack is an extended Family, centered on the two Leaders, Mother and Father Grey Wolf. The Pups are cared for by their Older Siblings, while Adult Cousins hunt for food for Everyone.

The Native Americans of the Plains heeded Grey Wolf’s wisdom since She taught them how to live properly. The Kiowa taught their children to respect Grey Wolf through prayer and proper hunting. In addition, many Indian people regarded Grey Wolf to be a good sign since She was strong, wise, and courageous.

Among various European peoples, Grey Wolf was a symbol of valor. The Celtic god, Cernunnos, Lord of the Animals, had Grey Wolf as one of his closest companions. The Romans said that the founding of their city began with a She-Wolf suckling Romulus and Remus. In Iceland, one Norse tribe claimed they were descended from Grey Wolf. In Scotland, the MacLennan and MacTyre Clans claimed lineage with Grey Wolf.

Meanwhile among the Baltic peoples, Grey Wolf was associated with the Other World. Sniffing amber, Grey Wolf received the power to communicate with the Unseen Forces. For the Baltic peoples, She acted as a guide to the Other Side.

The human hatred and fear of Grey Wolf has ancient roots. Stories of people fighting wolves spread from Siberia to Greenland, and from Mexico to Spain. At first, people and Grey Wolf competed in hunting for the same game Animals. Later when people domesticated Sheep and Cows, their hatred grew as Grey Wolf ate their Livestock.

Because of her independent spirit, Grey Wolf is both feared and respected by people. Unlike Dog who attends to people, She prefers her freedom. Though often misunderstood, Grey Wolf teaches you to trust your instincts. She helps people understand that they have the courage and endurance to face their problems. In a Grey Wolf Pack, She displays proper manners, but still keeps her sense of identity. Learn to trust yourself as Grey Wolf does.

“The return of the gray wolf to the American West isn’t just a triumph for conservationists. It’s a victory over the darkness in our own human nature. We see parts of ourselves in them, parts of our self that aren’t always acknowledged.” Copyright: “The Wolf in All of Us”, Katharine Mieszkowski.


Conservation Note: Grey Wolf is endangered in Europe and North America. Various governments are involved in reintroducing Grey Wolf to these areas.

Note:Red Wolf (Canis rufus) is the closest Wolf relative to Grey Wolf (Canis lupus). They are members of the Canis Family. Other wolves, such as Maned Wolf, belong to the larger family of Canidae, of which Canis is a subfamily. Other members of the Canis Subfamily are Coyote, Dingo, Domestic Dog, and Jackal.

Advertisements

One thought on “Grey Wolf: Trust of Self

  1. The Mongols follow the wolf as well (“wolf totem” is a Chinese film which explores this deeply.)

    The Norse, however had an interesting relationships with wolves. Odin’s ulfhednar, a warriors cult devoted to him, worshipped the wolf intensely as a part of their identity. The Völsunga Saga specifically follows a Scandinavian tribe that believed they were descended from wolves. The Sami people (who followed an indigenous series of gods), however, feared the wolf because they were not a fighting people and wolves were associated with the animals who killed their reindeer and the raiding Northmen.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s