To Curse or Not To Curse

 

moby_dick_p510_illustration

Moby Dick and Captain Ahab

At one time, I wanted a former boss, whom I worked for, dead. He had made my life miserable in and out of work. Since my family suffered because of him, I was filled with hatred and rage. I wanted revenge. But before I could do anything, he left to work in New York. Meanwhile, I set about repairing my ruined life.

After a few years, I stopped obsessing, and then simply forgot him. On September 11, 2001, my former boss narrowly escaped from the Second World Trade Tower. After the first plane hit the towers, his office evacuated. They were down the street when the second plane hit. After hearing of his survival, we at his former place of work, (including me) rejoiced at his good fortune.

Then it dawned on me that cursing and binding was not for me. By letting go of my old boss and forgiving him, I realized that I was better off. If I had cursed him, we would still be frozen in time. Being connected to him, I would be unable to move on. Because of that, my life would continue to be miserable.

As far as my old boss was concerned, I did have several choices at the time: quit my job, ask for a transfer, or look for another job. I did do the last two. Instead of cursing him, I had used my power instead to seek a legal way out of my dilemma.

In an essay on the ethics of cursing, Storm Faerywolf writes that that cursing is the last hope of the abused and powerless to obtain justice. Therefore, he believes that cursing can be used in the political arena against evil and for justice. Of course, he notes that your motives need to be evaluated as to why you are doing it. One thing, he cautions against is any reason that involves the ego or allows for the use of excessive force (such as self-righteousness). Faerywolf does stress that in many cases, cursing is not needed but is always tempting.

Donald Trump is a favorite target for cursing and binding. My problem with binding or cursing the President is what Hugh Hewitt, political columnist, writes about people, who accost and threaten public officials of the Trump Administration. He quotes Ian Millhiser, justice editor at ThinkProgress. “Tell me again why we shouldn’t confront Republicans where they eat, where they sleep, and where the work until they stop being complicit in the destruction of our democracy.” Responding to Millhiser, Randy Barnett, Georgetown Law professor said, “Because it is both wrong and supremely dangerous. When one sides denies the legitimacy of good faith disagreement over policy — as well as over constitutional principle — the other side will eventually reciprocate.” (Note 1) In other words, who has the final say of what is just and fair?

My philosophy about cursing is that it starts with the feeling of being violated. That is when we make ourselves victims. Our victimhood then gives us righteous reasons to curse. We would rather live with the familiarity of the wound than to go into the unknown of healing. Instead of doing shadow work and integrating our wounded parts, we choose the easier path of flinging our rage at others who hurt us. For me, my desire to curse tells for me to uncover what shadows are lurking. Then, I use legal means of rectifying the problem instead of cursing.

Notes:
Note 1. Hugh Hewitt, “The rumbling volcano that the left doesn’t hear.”

Works Used.
Bruce, Robert, “The Practical Psychic Self-Defense Handbook.” Hampton Roads Publishing: Charlottesville (VA). 2011.

Carlin, Emily, “Defense Against the Dark.” New Page Books: Pompton Plains (NY). 2011.

Faerywolf, Storm, “Beyond Toil and Trouble: On the Ethics and Practices of Hexing in Modern Witchcraft.” 2001. Storm Faerywolf. Web. http://faerywolf.com/beyond-toil-and-trouble/.

Hewitt, Hugh, “The rumbling volcano that the left doesn’t hear.” The Washington Post. 20 October 2018.

Matthews, Caitlin, “Psychic Shield.” Ulysses Press: Berkley. 2006.

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2 thoughts on “To Curse or Not To Curse

  1. “Tell me again why we shouldn’t confront Republicans where they eat, where they sleep, and where the work until they stop being complicit in the destruction of our democracy.” Responding to Millhiser, Randy Barnett, Georgetown Law professor said, “Because it is both wrong and supremely dangerous. When one sides denies the legitimacy of good faith disagreement over policy — as well as over constitutional principle — the other side will eventually reciprocate.” — The thing is, the other side already has. The other side murders BLM activists and Heather Heyer and people trying to protect the rainforests. Disturbing someone’s night out is nothing compared to this. Rightwingers only call for civility when their routines and their comfort are disturbed, not when bombs are sent to leftwing activists or politicians or news outlets.

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  2. When someone causes me injury or insult in anyway I fight my urge to be upset or want revenge. Time, practice and discipline have helped me. I personally will not give my energy to toxic people.
    As I see it, cursing people is to send negative energy and you can expect a karmic backlash even if you were the one being offended. I’d rather stay away and let them receive what is coming to them on their own.

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